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10th Annual Diversity Summit in partnership with NCCJ St. Louis

Wednesday, June 16, 2021

Diversity Awareness Partnership’s virtual 2021 Diversity Summit is an opportunity to expand our shared knowledge, as well as deepen our commitment to tangible action in each of our spheres of influence. This year we are partnering with NCCJ St. Louis as we continue to facilitate dialogue among D&I leaders, educators, business representatives, students, nonprofit organizations, religious & cultural institutions, and change-minded members of the public. This annual event is an opportunity to learn how to work collectively toward a more equitable future for St. Louis and the world at large. Our shared purpose is more urgent than ever in 2021, both in spite of and because of the challenges we have faced in the past twelve months. As we experience the inequities exacerbated by the pandemic, the ongoing need to work toward justice for all marginalized people, and the many complex systems that impact us as communities and individuals, it is crucial that we consider new possibilities for the years to come. We hope you will save the date for the 2021 Diversity Summit, June 16. Your voice and your imagination are needed, and we look forward to sharing this digital space.

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2021 Diversity Summit Keynote Speaker

Katrina Jones
Katrina Jones

Inclusion, Diversity & Equity Leader with AWS

Katrina Jones is a diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) leader, champion and entrepreneur. She works with organizations to create strategic and process driven solutions that disrupt bias and foster more equitable and inclusive workplaces. Katrina has served as a diversity and inclusion lead at large, complex, global companies and startups, and has owned and implemented strategies designed to attract, retain, and advance talent from historically marginalized and underrepresented communities. Katrina’s passion for DEI is rooted in her bold vision for an equitable and just society, in which we collectively work to address access and opportunity gaps. Katrina has a Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies from The University of Texas at Austin, and a Master of Arts in Human Resource Management from The Catholic University of America. She lives in the Atlanta metro area with her funny and (very!) lively family.
Desiree S. Coleman
Desiree S. Coleman

Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Leader

Natalie Galucia
Natalie Galucia

Harvey A. Friedman Center for Aging at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University

Jess Jones
Jess Jones

Jess Jones Education and Consulting

Ed Bryant
Ed Bryant

United Way of Greater St. Louis

Jason Hartsfield
Jason Hartsfield

Starkloff Disability Institute

Josina Greene
Josina Greene

St. Louis Community Foundation

Rabell Afridi
Rabell Afridi

Social Justice Educator and Advocate

Bomi Park
Bomi Park

St. Louis Mosaic Project

DeWitt Campbell
DeWitt Campbell

NCCJ St. Louis

Sarah Masoud
Sarah Masoud

Diversity Awareness Partnership

Jamie Larson
Jamie Larson

Pathways to Independence

 Rey Castuciano
Rey Castuciano

Table Wisdom

Darlene Martin
Darlene Martin

United Way of Greater St. Louis

Elisabeth Wurm
Elisabeth Wurm

Dot Foods, Inc. / Not Just Enneacoach

Rachel D'Souza-Siebert
Rachel D'Souza-Siebert

Gladiator Consulting

Darius Rucker
Darius Rucker

Williams and Associates, Inc. & Teach for America - St. Louis Prism Board

Dr. Kristen Wagner
Dr. Kristen Wagner

Three x Three Consulting, LLC

Geoffrey Soyiantet
Geoffrey Soyiantet

Vitendo 4 Africa

Rita Chang
Rita Chang

Immigrant Service Providers Network

Speakers

Meet Our Speakers

Steven Spencer
Steven Spencer

Paraquad

Matt Picchiello
Matt Picchiello

Clinical Geropsychology Laboratory at Washington University

Brittin Haury LaMar
Brittin Haury LaMar

United Way of Greater St. Louis

Pier Yvette Alsup
Pier Yvette Alsup

Together Credit Union (formerly Anheuser-Busch Credit Union)

David Dwight IV
David Dwight IV

Forward Through Ferguson (FTF)

Jane Callahan
Jane Callahan

Joseph H. and Florence A. Roblee Foundation,

Tyrell Manning
Tyrell Manning
Erica Williams
Erica Williams

A Red Circle

Gabriela Ramírez-Arellano
Gabriela Ramírez-Arellano

Cortex Innovation Community

Christina Meneses
Christina Meneses

NCCJ St. Louis

Event Schedule

Wednesday, June 16th, 2021

8:30 AM CDT
Welcome
Keynote Introduction

Taylor Mason | DAP Board President
Principal, David Mason + Associates

8:45 – 10:00 AM CDT
Keynote Presentation
10:00 – 10:15 AM CDT
Networking Break
10:15 – 11:45 AM CDT

 

Breakout sessions (1)
Creating Equitable Spaces for Women of Color in the Workplace

Being a woman of color in the world presents a unique set of challenges in workplaces, on campuses, in the classroom, and in the community. This interactive lecture will help participants understand the microaggressions that women of color experience and identify ways that allies, managers, colleagues, and leaders in positions of power can shift workplaces’ dynamics to create belonging, psychological safety, and equity.  

Objectives: 

  • Have a greater understanding of intersectionality and the cross-section of race and gender issues 
  • Identify how employees with intersecting identities (sexual identity, race, gender, ability status, socioeconomic status, etc.) can experience additional layers of bias, racism, and discrimination 
  • Have the tools to define, understand and identify microaggressions, bias, and discrimination 
  • Actively identify ways that they personally can dismantle bias within their own spheres of influence 

Presenter: 

Desiree S. Coleman 

Working with People with Disabilities: Making Accessibility and Inclusivity the New Normal

Jamie Larson will discuss: 

  • The concept of neurodiversity 
  • Social/emotional needs of people with different developmental disabilities or complex learning disabilities 
  • Employment soft skills and social skills in the workplace as they relate to people with different types of disabilities 
  • Unwritten rules of the workplace 

Steven Spencer will discuss: 

  • Teaching techniques (can be helpful for people with disabilities or people who have been out of the workforce) 
  • Delegating or teaching tasks to people with different abilities/learning styles 
  • Finding and utilizing natural supports 
  • Motivation and reinforcement 
  • Utilizing a job coach (both how an employee can use a job coach and how an employer can use a job coach) 
  • Outlining the expectations clearly and accessing resources; using SMART goals to have a clear understanding between both employer and employee 
  • Workplace accommodations  

Objectives: 

  • Define neurodiversity and understand how disabilities are often on a spectrum; when you’ve met one person with a disability, you’ve met one person with a disability 
  • Implement several simple strategies to make the workplace more inclusive and accessible to the social/emotional needs of people with disabilities 
  • Implement several strategies to make delegating and teaching tasks more accessible to people with disabilities or different learning styles 

Presenters: 

Jamie Larson 

Pathways to Independence 

Steven Spencer 

Paraquad 

Queering Normal: Visions for LGBTQ+ Equity and Inclusion

For many members of the LGBTQ+ community, “normalcy” was never an option. From public spaces to the workplace, how queer and transgender people navigate the world has too often been informed by the ways they are excluded and invisibilized. This session explores these patterns of exclusion and offers a new perspective on what it means to “normalize” LGBTQ+ lives. Participants will be offered a framework for thinking about LGBTQ+ equity and inclusion, as well as practical strategies for implementation. 


Objectives: 

Following this session  participants will be able to 

    • Identify common barriers and inequities faced LGBTQ+ individuals 
    • Examine gender norms across contexts
    • Apply strategies for change

Presenter:  

Jess Jones 

Jess Jones Education and Consulting

Resisting Ageism and Advancing a New Narrative on Productive Aging

When it comes to diversity and inclusivity, age consistently ranks low in the list of priorities. Yet, age bias affects both young and old, regardless of identity. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic over this past year, this has shown itself more than ever—in healthcare, the workplace, and our day to day lives. With demographic trends projecting an older population that’s larger than the younger population by 2050, there are plenty of opportunities to harness the value that older adults bring to society. In St. Louis today, over 50% of the population comes from the Baby Boomer generation. Ageism will play a major role in how much benefit we’ll realize post COVID-19. In this session you will learn how ageism impacts people of all ages, including results from a research study conducted in St. Louis on the intersection of COVID-19 and age and how you can address this in your own life. In order to move forward in an equitable way, we must advance another narrative; older adults are a heterogeneous group, survivors and essential workers, and overall have fared well during and will continue to thrive after the COVID-19 pandemic.   

Presenters: 

Natalie Galucia 

Harvey A. Friedman Center for Aging at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University 

Rey Castuciano 

Table Wisdom 

Matt Picchiello 

Clinical Geropsychology Laboratory at Washington University 

Equity in the Health and Human Services Sector

United Way of Greater St. Louis is the region’s largest private funder of non-profit health and human services. We recently completed a regional community needs assessment that has helped to inform us on how to prioritize the most pressing needs of the community. During the COVID-19 pandemic, United Way leaned into the work of coordinating the region’s response and continues to work on regional recovery efforts. During the regional pandemic response, long-term inequities were exacerbated, and many of the region’s most vulnerable people were inordinately negatively impacted. Informed by the real-time response and recovery work, we learned that we needed to prioritize some of our work around building capacity within the system and systems change.  

Objectives: 

We will discuss several key areas of proposed focus for non-profit agencies, including: 

  • Agency capacity building 
  • Public policy advocacy and systems change 
  • Targeted universalism approaches to regional recovery and rebuilding 

Presenters: 

Darlene Martin 

United Way of Greater St. Louis

 

Brittin Haury LaMar 

United Way of Greater St. Louis

Ed Bryant 

United Way of Greater St. Louis

11:45 AM – 12:45 PM CDT
Lunch
12:30 PM CST
Summit Remarks

Robyn Heidger | DAP Board Vice President
SVP, Strategic Alliances & Inclusion, Enterprise Bank & Trust

Melissa Brickey
Executive Director, Diversity Awareness Partnership

12:45 – 2:15 PM CDT
Breakout sessions (2)
Defense Mechanisms & Anti-Racism Work

One barrier to practicing effective anti-racism work is that we often get defensive and stuck in unproductive conversation. In this session, we will discuss the inner work that is necessary to engage in productive outer work around anti-racism. This includes becoming aware of how our defensive mechanisms show up when we are held accountable for problematic behavior. Through mindfulness, self-compassion, and practice, we can build our resiliency and capacity to stay in uncomfortable conversations. This will lead to more authentic conversations and productive action in our community and workplaces.  

Objectives: 

  • Identify personal defensive mechanisms 
  • Understand the unconscious motivation behind the defensiveness 
  • Learn the four steps of building resiliency in order to engage in more productive conversation around anti-racism 

Presenter: 

Elisabeth Wurm 

Dot Foods, Inc. / Not Just Enneacoach

Insights Into Financial Inclusion During the Pandemic: What We Know. What We Learned. What We Can Do Better.

Public health and social history suggest that environmental and economic crisis tend to compound existing socio-economic circumstances; therefore, there is no reason to assume that the COVID-19 pandemic crisis-situation is any different.  

It’s also been established that the breadth of dynamics that make this dilemma true are, by nature, exacerbated by crisis—the more critical and broader-based, generally the greater the impact on vulnerable communities. 

Although not limited to, this would tend to suggest that Americans with limited access to or comfort using communications technology found their access to financial services further impeded by the COVID-19 restrictions. 

In this session on Financial Inclusion, we will address the impact the pandemic had on low to medium income communities and other demographic groups. We will discover the role the “digital divide” played in Americans accessing and managing their bank accounts and government relief payments.  

Lastly, we will consider the lessons learned and identify best practices to imagine a more financially inclusive society. 

Objectives:  

  • Understand how/why the Digital Divide was more apparent during the pandemic, especially for the low-income population  
  • Discuss the opportunities and challenges that exist with the pandemic relief programs 
  • Explore ways to apply lessons learned to enhance access to financial services for the low income and the unbanked population 

Presenter: 

Pier Yvette Alsup 

Together Credit Union (formerly Anheuser-Busch Credit Union) 

A New, Accessible Normal: What the COVID-19 Pandemic Taught Us About Disability and How We Can Do Better

People with disabilities represent the most vulnerable population to the COVID-19 pandemic, and yet healthcare providers have little to no data about who in their communities has a disability. Data shows that remote workers can be just as efficient as in-house workers, yet employment opportunities for people with disabilities created by the pandemic are threatening to disappear as companies return to the office. New digital tools are enabling people to connect around the world, but many of these tools are inaccessible or too costly. As the world progresses to the “new normal,” what needs to be done to ensure people with disabilities don’t continue to be disregarded or forgotten about? In this breakout session, Starkloff Disability Institute will share best practices that organizations and communities can utilize to ensure the new normal we create is a safer, more accessible, and more inclusive one for people with disabilities. 

Objectives: 

  • Gain knowledge in the unique challenges facing individuals with disabilities in employment, healthcare, and digital access 
  • Learn best practice for increasing disability inclusion in the post-pandemic world 
  • Learn advocacy skills to utilize for pushing for disability inclusion in your own organizations and workplaces 

Presenter: 

Jason Hartsfield 

Starkloff Disability Institute

Case Study of Anti-Racism in Philanthropy and Fundraising

Rachel D’Souza-Siebert will host a panel to discuss shifts and strategy in local giving regarding equity and systems change. We anticipate that participants will develop a baseline understanding of how to introduce anti-racism into practices at their own organizations, get practical tools and knowledge of how to introduce antiracism into practices at their own organizations, and understand the missteps and pitfalls that can occur when moving from mission-thinking to vision-thinking. 

Presenters: 

Rachel D’Souza-Siebert (Moderator) 

Gladiator Consulting 

David Dwight IV 

Forward Through Ferguson (FTF) 

Josina Greene 

St. Louis Community Foundation 

Jane Callahan

Joseph H. and Florence A. Roblee Foundation

Finding PRIDE in Building Community: Recognizing Relationships as a Critical Part of Our COVID-19 Reset

For a long time, we have understood that LGBTQ+ populations may have familial structures that are non-traditional and often times can be forged out of a need to survive. In this session, you will learn about the intricate dynamics of relationships within LGBTQ+ populations and how they have been crucial to navigating COVID-19 challenges and beyond. You will engage in a reflective space that will produce actionable steps for how you can center the relationship as a tool of support and healing. Join us as we find PRIDE in building community! 

Objectives:  

  • Participants will understand the importance of creating and developing a relationship with LGBTQ+ populations and its relationship to strong support systems 
  • Participants will understand how LGBTQ+ populations utilize relationships and family as a driver of personal healing 
  • Participants will dialogue and reflect on how podcasts, blogs/vlogs, and social media platforms contribute(d) to positive self-care, growing, and healing specifically for LGBTQ+ populations with a special lens to COVID-19 
  • Participants will think about actionable steps to disrupt systemically oppressive processes and protocols, whether individual actions or organizational structures 
  • Participants will gain insight into the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality as it relates to inequitable systems and how to shift away from those in a post-COVID-19 world 

Presenters: 

Darius Rucker (he/him) 

Williams and Associates, Inc. & Teach for America – St. Louis Prism Board 

Tyrell Manning 

2:15 – 2:30 PM CDT
Networking Break
2:30 – 4:00 PM CDT
Breakout sessions (3)
Books Are Magic: An Ingredient to Address Bias and Racism in the Classroom

Although the majority of educators read stories out loud to their students on a daily basis, most do not use their texts as an opportunity to facilitate conversations on bias, racism, microaggressions, and more. The countless benefits for children being read aloud to include: building good listening habits, reading comprehension and language processing, and even inspiration to read on their own. However, one benefit that isn’t addressed as commonly is the opportunity to engage children in anti-bias anti-racism work through literature. Reading aloud novels serves as a developmentally appropriate springboard for these conversations while still supporting grade level standards. The rich opportunities present in novels to help understand the characters’ points of views in dealing with issues such as police brutality and racial stereotypes help students not only better understand these experiences but also build empathy and brainstorm action for change.  

Objectives: 

  • Identify how to choose a novel to create a more equitable learning environment  
  • Plan the implementation of a text  
  • Explain the significance of building empathy through read alouds 

Presenter: 

Rabell Afridi 

Social Justice Educator and Advocate

Connecting and Healing Our Communities Through Nature

We know that social relationships have a profound effect on our physical and mental health, longevity, and happiness. Yet, in our country, one in five Americans report that they are lonely. Research also suggests that connecting with nature has profound effects on our social well-being and our health, resulting in decreased likelihood of cardiovascular disease, depression, and autoimmune disease. All indications suggest that the pandemic is the beginning of a new normal that will require us to shift how we live in relation to one another and our natural environment. The good news is that many of us have already begun to make this shift, so it is the perfect time to design how to do this more equitably and in a way that promotes connection and healing. The breakout session will provide an overview of the importance of community-building strategies that provide opportunities for people to connect with one another and with nature. Session facilitators will share practical examples of ways to engage community members through food production, mutual aid, and creative placemaking that promote racial healing and equity. More specifically, the work of A Red Circle, located in North St. Louis County, will be highlighted as a promising practice example of connecting and healing through nature. 

Objectives: 

  • A greater understanding of the concept of belonging as a keystone to equity-based community building 
  • Creative ways to identify connection and healing opportunities in organizations and communities 
  • Strategies to engage the skills, talents, and knowledge of community members in nature-centered healing activities 

Presenters: 

Dr. Kristen Wagner 

Three x Three Consulting, LLC 

Erica Williams 

A Red Circle 

How to Show Up as an Ally for the Immigrant Communities During and Post the Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the racial economic inequality among migrants and refugee communities. Moreover, AAPI in America are facing a heightened fear of racist abuse among other health concerns due to the pandemic. What can local leaders and organizations do to alleviate the pain of distressed communities? Hear from St. Louis community leaders on how to show up as an ally for the immigrant communities in St. Louis.  

Objectives: 

  • Understand how racial economic inequality and racism towards immigrant communities have exacerbated since the pandemic
  • Learn about allyship for immigrant communities
  • Understand how local leaders can step up to support the distressed communities

Presenters: 

Bomi Park (Moderator) 

St. Louis Mosaic Project 

Geoffrey Soyiantet 

Vitendo 4 Africa 

Gabriela Ramírez-Arellano 

Cortex Innovation Community 

Rachel D’Souza-Siebert 

Gladiator Consulting 

Rita Chang 

Immigrant Service Providers Network

Liberation Is a WE Thing, Not a THEY Thing: Why All Racial Groups Need to Work to End White Supremacy

In the United States, people of all racial groups have all been enlisted in upholding white supremacy in varying ways. In this workshop, we will explore the roots of our divisions and emphasize the need to be of one accord to eradicate white supremacy.  

Objectives: 

  • To explore various ways white supremacy has sewn divisions between and enlisted different racial groups to uphold white supremacy 
  • To hear some of the ways racial groups have been negatively impacted by white supremacy 
  • To discuss how our liberation is tied to one another 

Presenters: 

Christina Meneses 

NCCJ St. Louis 

DeWitt Campbell 

NCCJ St. Louis  

Sarah Masoud 

Diversity Awareness Partnership 

Frequently Asked Questions

The 2021 Diversity Summit is virtual. What does that mean?

We will be using Zoom to host all of our conference sessions. Please make sure you have the latest version of Zoom downloaded before the conference begins.

You can explore the platform to visit our different sponsors and exhibitors as well as chat with other attendees and access your sessions. 

When is the 2021 Diversity Summit?

June 16, 2021

When does individual registration close?

Registration closes at 5:00pm CDT on June 14, 2021

When is the deadline for sponsor registration?

June 7, 2021

When is the deadline for sponsors to submit an ad?

May 25, 2021

How much does it cost to attend the Diversity Summit?

Individual tickets are $125.00

Click here for sponsor opportunities

How do I sign onto the event on the day of the event?

Return to this site on the day of the event. There will be a login button on the top of your screen. Use the username and password you set up during registration to login and start exploring the virtual event space. 

Are there any options for reduced rates or student prices?

For student tickets, please contact Tina Mahtani at tmahtani@dapinclusive.org for discounted pricing for full-time students

I have made a mistake in my registration form, but the form is already submitted. What should I do?

Please email Tina Mahtani at tmahtani@dapinclusive.org with any changes you need to make to your registration 

Can the workshops be played on my phone?

While zoom does have a mobile app, we do not recommend trying to access the event from your phone.The platform is optimized for a desktop or laptop computer. We recommend Chrome for the best experience. 

What browsers and Operating system do I need to run for this to work properly?

For best results we recommend the latest version of Chrome of Firefox. You can also use the latest version of Safari or Edge, but some features may require extra clicks or may not look correct. 

Are there breaks?

Yes, there will be time in between each block of breakout sessions during which you may take a break or spend time in the virtual networking lounge.

Can I share my registration?

No.

Will I be able to re-watch content?

No.

What will the event look like when I sign on?

When you log in you will see an image of a St. Louis landmark. As you move your cursor around you will notice hotspots which all lead to different rooms or pieces of information. Make sure to visit the agenda to access your full schedule.

If you would like to include your name and pronouns in your Zoom username, you can do so by taking the following steps:
  1. During your Zoom meeting, click Participants at the bottom of your screen.
  2. A list of participants will show to the right. Hover the mouse pointer over your name until you see the option More.
  3. Click More and select Rename.
  4. In the pop-up box, enter your first and last name and click OK or Rename to confirm.
Are closed captions available for sessions?

Yes.

Will there be opportunities to chat with presenters, and how do I ask a presenter a question?

For most of our presentations you will not be able to speak to the presenter. There is a Q&A button in each of these sessions where you will be able to put your questions during the presentation. The speakers and moderators will be able to see these to make sure they get answered.

What time is the event?

The Summit starts at 8:00 am and ends at 4:00 pm CDT

What time is the Keynote Speaker’s presentation?

8:45-10:00am CST

What times are the different sessions in the event?
  • 10:15-11:45 am CDT
  • 12:45-2:15 pm CDT
  • 2:30 – 4:00 pm CDT
Will all the sessions be recorded?

No, sessions will not be recorded.

What sessions are being offered?

Check back soon for updates

Will speaker handouts be available?

TBD

What are some opportunities for networking at the 2021 Diversity Summit?

There will be time in between each block of breakout sessions during which you may take a break or spend time in the virtual networking lounge.

Who attends the Diversity Summit?

Each year the Diversity Summit is attended by a dynamic group of D&I leaders, educators, business representatives, students, nonprofit organizations, religious & cultural institutions, and change-minded members of the public.

What is the Resource Fair?

The Resource Fair is an exhibit of booths with information regarding additional organizations and equity-centered initiatives that may interest attendees.

How do I sign up to have a booth at the Resource Fair?
When can I explore the Resource Fair during the event?

The Resource Fair will open at 8:00 am CDT. Additional opportunities to visit the Resource Fair will be available in between each block for breakout sessions.

I still haven’t found the answer to my question. Who should I write to?

Please feel free to contact Tina Mahtani at tmahtani@dapinclusive.org

Cancellation policy

Please email Tina Mahtani at tmahtani@dapinclusive.org with the request to cancel your ticket and we will process your refund.

If you need to cancel your registration, you must cancel by June 9th in order to receive a refund of your registration cost. No refunds will be made after this date for any reason.

Can I transfer my registration if I am unable to attend?

Yes Please email Tina Mahtani at tmahtani@dapinclusive.org with any changes you need to make to your registration

If a guest is no longer able to make it, the replacement’s name must be submitted by June 14, 2021